Canadian Federal Politics

A collection of all our federal politics polling. This is an open discussion forum to respond to our latest vote numbers and more. Have your say on the federal political scene and Liberal government.

A collection of all our federal politics polling. This is an open discussion forum to respond to our latest vote numbers and more. Have your say on the federal political scene and Liberal government.

Discussions: All (19) Open (5)
  • While “elbowgate” has dominated headlines for a week now, a majority (63%) of Canadians believe the incident was no big deal, and it doesn’t appear to have hurt Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s approval rating which remains strong at 62%. What do you think?

    While “elbowgate” has dominated headlines for a week now, a majority (63%) of Canadians believe the incident was no big deal, and it doesn’t appear to have hurt Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s approval rating which remains strong at 62%. What do you think?

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  • The new Liberal government delivered its budget Tuesday. In an effort to spur economic growth after almost a decade of fiscal restraint the Budget will add more than $100 billion to the federal debt over the next five years.

    There’s billions in new spending on infrastructure, Aboriginal Peoples, and transfers to middle and lower income Canadians. The Liberals claim their budget will create 100,000 jobs and boost national economic growth, as measured by gross domestic product, by half a percentage point per year.

    During last year’s campaign, the Liberals promised “modest deficits” of no more than $10 billion over the... Continue reading

    The new Liberal government delivered its budget Tuesday. In an effort to spur economic growth after almost a decade of fiscal restraint the Budget will add more than $100 billion to the federal debt over the next five years.

    There’s billions in new spending on infrastructure, Aboriginal Peoples, and transfers to middle and lower income Canadians. The Liberals claim their budget will create 100,000 jobs and boost national economic growth, as measured by gross domestic product, by half a percentage point per year.

    During last year’s campaign, the Liberals promised “modest deficits” of no more than $10 billion over the course of their mandate and to balance the books by 2019-20. However, the Liberals are now projecting a $29.4-billion deficit in 2016-17, followed by a $29-billion shortfall the following year and almost $23 billion in 2018-19. The Budget projects a $14.3 billion deficit in 2020-21 – after the next scheduled federal election.

    The budget promises new studies and commissions to develop more innovative economic policy, presumably with future price tags on top of the many funding announcements in the current budget. These include:
    • $8.4 billion over five years to help indigenous communities, including $2 billion on water and wastewater systems in First Nations and $2.6 billion over five years for primary and secondary education on reserves.
    • $10 billion more over two years for a new Canada child benefit, absorbing and replacing both the Canada child tax benefit and the universal child care benefit.
    • $6.6 billion over two years for infrastructure, less than the $10 billion promised in the Liberal election platform.
    • $3.4 billion over five years to increase the guaranteed income supplement top-up benefit for single seniors, and restore the old age security eligibility age to 65 from 67.
    • $2 billion over three years for a new strategic investment fund for infrastructure improvements at colleges and universities.
    • $2 billion over two years for a low-carbon economy fund, beginning in 2017-18.

    Is the Federal Budget good or bad for you? Good or bad for Canada?

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  • In anticipation of the Trudeau government’s inaugural budget on Tuesday, half of Canadians (55%) appear willing to support a modest budget deficit of $10 billion, but most oppose a deficit greater than what the Liberals pledged during last year’s election. However, six in ten Canadians (63%) say the Liberal deficit target of $10 billion during the campaign was just a ploy to get elected. Do you think deficits are good, bad or a necessary evil?


    In anticipation of the Trudeau government’s inaugural budget on Tuesday, half of Canadians (55%) appear willing to support a modest budget deficit of $10 billion, but most oppose a deficit greater than what the Liberals pledged during last year’s election. However, six in ten Canadians (63%) say the Liberal deficit target of $10 billion during the campaign was just a ploy to get elected. Do you think deficits are good, bad or a necessary evil?


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  • Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump has suggested that the North American Free Trade Agreement costs America jobs, and that he would revoke the treaty if he becomes president. 

    On Trump’s assertion that NAFTA damages the U.S. economy, a majority (63%) of Americans disagree (17% strongly/46% somewhat) that “Free Trade with Canada and Mexico is damaging the U.S. economy”, while four in ten (37%) Americans agree (11% strongly/26% somewhat) with his position.

    Despite a majority disagreeing with Trump’s position, Americans are nearly equally split on whether or not they agree (48% -- 15% strongly/33% somewhat) or disagree (52% -- 14% strongly/38%... Continue reading

    Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump has suggested that the North American Free Trade Agreement costs America jobs, and that he would revoke the treaty if he becomes president. 

    On Trump’s assertion that NAFTA damages the U.S. economy, a majority (63%) of Americans disagree (17% strongly/46% somewhat) that “Free Trade with Canada and Mexico is damaging the U.S. economy”, while four in ten (37%) Americans agree (11% strongly/26% somewhat) with his position.

    Despite a majority disagreeing with Trump’s position, Americans are nearly equally split on whether or not they agree (48% -- 15% strongly/33% somewhat) or disagree (52% -- 14% strongly/38% somewhat) that they would “support the United States pulling out of the North American Free Trade Agreement”.

    Tell us what you think about the NAFTA agreement, and Trump's position on revoking the treaty. What impact would it have on Canada?

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  • Direction with logo 02 11 2016

    The honeymoon for the new federal Liberal government is likely coming to an end. In three short months, a majority of Canadians have gone from believing that the country is heading in the right direction to believing that we are now off on the wrong track. This is the widest disparity with negatives outweighing positives since 2010. Is Canada heading in the right direction or off on the wrong track?


    The honeymoon for the new federal Liberal government is likely coming to an end. In three short months, a majority of Canadians have gone from believing that the country is heading in the right direction to believing that we are now off on the wrong track. This is the widest disparity with negatives outweighing positives since 2010. Is Canada heading in the right direction or off on the wrong track?


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    Politics   vote sign

    The 2015 Canadian Federal Election had the highest voter turnout in decades with over 17 million Canadians casting a ballot. After ten years of Harper's Conservatives, Canadians elected a Liberal majority government in decisive fashion. Here are the results (as of October 20): 
    Liberals = 39.5% of votes, 184 seats
    Conservatives = 31.9% of votes, 99 seats
    NDP = 19.7% of votes, 44 seats
    Bloc Québécois = 4.7% of votes, 10 seats
    Green Party = 3.4% of votes, 1 seat

    The 2015 Canadian Federal Election had the highest voter turnout in decades with over 17 million Canadians casting a ballot. After ten years of Harper's Conservatives, Canadians elected a Liberal majority government in decisive fashion. Here are the results (as of October 20): 

    Liberals = 39.5% of votes, 184 seats
    Conservatives = 31.9% of votes, 99 seats
    NDP = 19.7% of votes, 44 seats
    Bloc Québécois = 4.7% of votes, 10 seats
    Green Party = 3.4% of votes, 1 seat

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    7021 lg

    Our latest poll has the Liberals (37%) well ahead of the Conservatives (31%) and NDP (24%). Also, four-in-ten (38%) believe Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister, compared to Stephen Harper (32%) and Thomas Mulcair (30%). Momentum seems to be in favour of Trudeau's Liberals this week. Tell us why you're voting on Monday.


    Our latest poll has the Liberals (37%) well ahead of the Conservatives (31%) and NDP (24%). Also, four-in-ten (38%) believe Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister, compared to Stephen Harper (32%) and Thomas Mulcair (30%). Momentum seems to be in favour of Trudeau's Liberals this week. Tell us why you're voting on Monday.


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    7013 lg
    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of decided eligible voters would vote for the Conservative Party under Prime Minister Stephen Harper (32% for Liberals and 26% for NDP). The dynamics of this federal election campaign are unprecedented: all three major federal parties have been in all three positions – first, second, and third – at some point since the campaign began, and all three have also been statistically tied for the lead with each other.


    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of decided eligible voters would vote for the Conservative Party under Prime Minister Stephen Harper (32% for Liberals and 26% for NDP). The dynamics of this federal election campaign are unprecedented: all three major federal parties have been in all three positions – first, second, and third – at some point since the campaign began, and all three have also been statistically tied for the lead with each other.


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    7005 lg

    With two months of election campaigning behind us, our latest poll has the Liberals at 33% (Unchanged), Conservatives at 32% (+5) and NDP at 27% (-3). The Conservatives have rallied in Ontario and Quebec to challenge for the lead, while the NDP's share of popular vote has decreased by roughly 2 points each week since early September when they held 34% of the popular vote.


    With two months of election campaigning behind us, our latest poll has the Liberals at 33% (Unchanged), Conservatives at 32% (+5) and NDP at 27% (-3). The Conservatives have rallied in Ontario and Quebec to challenge for the lead, while the NDP's share of popular vote has decreased by roughly 2 points each week since early September when they held 34% of the popular vote.


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    There's been no shortage of social media gaffes across all party lines since the campaign began in August. While social media provides an unfiltered view of political candidates, sometimes to a fault, it can also be used to extend the reach of messages and tap into new potential voters. In fact, Canadians on social media daily are more likely to vote for leader and party they believe in (58%) than those not using social media often (46%). Tell us how you are using social media to follow this election.

    There's been no shortage of social media gaffes across all party lines since the campaign began in August. While social media provides an unfiltered view of political candidates, sometimes to a fault, it can also be used to extend the reach of messages and tap into new potential voters. In fact, Canadians on social media daily are more likely to vote for leader and party they believe in (58%) than those not using social media often (46%). Tell us how you are using social media to follow this election.

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    6964 sm

    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of eligible voters would vote for Thomas Mulcair and the NDP (unchanged). Justin Trudeau and the Liberals would receive 30% of the decided vote (up 2 points), while Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives would receive 29% of the vote (down 2 points). The federal election campaign appears to be having little impact on the vote choice of Canadians so far, despite the sustained coverage of Nigel Wright’s testimony in the Mike Duffy trial and the recent volatility of financial markets and the Canadian economy.


    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of eligible voters would vote for Thomas Mulcair and the NDP (unchanged). Justin Trudeau and the Liberals would receive 30% of the decided vote (up 2 points), while Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives would receive 29% of the vote (down 2 points). The federal election campaign appears to be having little impact on the vote choice of Canadians so far, despite the sustained coverage of Nigel Wright’s testimony in the Mike Duffy trial and the recent volatility of financial markets and the Canadian economy.


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    6943 lg

    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of decided voters would vote for the NDP (-1).  The incumbent Conservatives would receive 31% of the vote (-2), while 28% would vote for the Liberals (+3). 


    If the election were held tomorrow, 33% of decided voters would vote for the NDP (-1).  The incumbent Conservatives would receive 31% of the vote (-2), while 28% would vote for the Liberals (+3). 


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    Imho millennials

    Millennials are politically engaged, but are choosing to express themselves online, rather than at the ballot box. Four-in-ten (42%) of Millennials voted in the 2011 Federal Election yet 64% are online weekly to get information about or discuss policy, social and political issues. What should the federal parties do to motivate Millennial voters?


    Millennials are politically engaged, but are choosing to express themselves online, rather than at the ballot box. Four-in-ten (42%) of Millennials voted in the 2011 Federal Election yet 64% are online weekly to get information about or discuss policy, social and political issues. What should the federal parties do to motivate Millennial voters?


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    6925 lg

    July 2015 - If an election were held tomorrow, 34% of decided voters would cast their ballot for the NDP led by Thomas Mulcair (down 1 point since June), while 33% would vote for Stephen Harper and the Conservatives (up 5 points). Justin Trudeau and the Liberals would receive just 25% of the vote (down 4 points).


    July 2015 - If an election were held tomorrow, 34% of decided voters would cast their ballot for the NDP led by Thomas Mulcair (down 1 point since June), while 33% would vote for Stephen Harper and the Conservatives (up 5 points). Justin Trudeau and the Liberals would receive just 25% of the vote (down 4 points).


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    Wynne Liberals (34%) losing ground but hold tenuous lead over PCs and new leader Patrick Brown (32%). Ontario NDP would receive 25% of the decided popular vote.

    • In the 416 (Toronto), the Liberals (39%) lead the NDP (32%), PCs (20%) and other parties (9%)
    • In the 905 (GTA), the PCs (37%) and Liberals (36%) are tied, with the NDP (19%) and other parties (8%) well behind.
    • In Southwest Ontario, the PCs (34%) have a slight lead over the Liberals (30%) and NDP (26%), while other parties (10%) are further behind.
    • In Central Ontario, the PCs ... Continue reading

    Wynne Liberals (34%) losing ground but hold tenuous lead over PCs and new leader Patrick Brown (32%). Ontario NDP would receive 25% of the decided popular vote.

    • In the 416 (Toronto), the Liberals (39%) lead the NDP (32%), PCs (20%) and other parties (9%)
    • In the 905 (GTA), the PCs (37%) and Liberals (36%) are tied, with the NDP (19%) and other parties (8%) well behind.
    • In Southwest Ontario, the PCs (34%) have a slight lead over the Liberals (30%) and NDP (26%), while other parties (10%) are further behind.
    • In Central Ontario, the PCs (45%) have the hammer over the Liberals (32%), NDP (17%) and other parties (6%).
    • In Eastern Ontario, the PCs (41%) also lead the Liberals (34%), ND P (17%) and other parties (8%).
    • In Northern Ontario, the NDP (52%) has a sizeable lead over the Liberals (27%), PCs (16%) and other parties (6%).


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    Consider this...

    • Most (88%) Canadians ‘support’ (65% strongly/23% somewhat) a ‘requirement that people show their face during Canadian citizenship ceremonies’.
    • Seven in ten (72%) ‘agree’ (36% strongly/36% somewhat) that ‘face coverings such as the burqa or niqab worn by some Muslim women are symbols of oppression and rooted in a culture that is anti-women’.
    • Two in three (66%) Canadians ‘agree’ (27% strongly/39% somewhat) that they ‘support extending the Canadian Forces mission in Iraq against ISIS past its current end date of April 7, 2015’.
    • Two in three (65%) Canadians ‘agree’ (25% strongly/39% somewhat) that they ‘support the use... Continue reading

    Consider this...

    • Most (88%) Canadians ‘support’ (65% strongly/23% somewhat) a ‘requirement that people show their face during Canadian citizenship ceremonies’.
    • Seven in ten (72%) ‘agree’ (36% strongly/36% somewhat) that ‘face coverings such as the burqa or niqab worn by some Muslim women are symbols of oppression and rooted in a culture that is anti-women’.
    • Two in three (66%) Canadians ‘agree’ (27% strongly/39% somewhat) that they ‘support extending the Canadian Forces mission in Iraq against ISIS past its current end date of April 7, 2015’.
    • Two in three (65%) Canadians ‘agree’ (25% strongly/39% somewhat) that they ‘support the use of Canadian Forces on the ground in a combat mission against ISIS in Iraq, down 4 points since the start of February.

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    6774 1lg

    Liberals and Conservatives in a dead heat! What will it take to break the tie? Have your say!


    Liberals and Conservatives in a dead heat! What will it take to break the tie? Have your say!


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    Fedvote dec 14
    Liberals and Conservatives are neck and neck. The chart below shows the 2014 federal vote support over time. Who will pull ahead in the new year?


    Liberals and Conservatives are neck and neck. The chart below shows the 2014 federal vote support over time. Who will pull ahead in the new year?


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